How to Describe an Apple


As most of us who write about food have likely felt at one time or another, writing about it and in particular, describing it is not easy. Many adjectives that pop into my head are overused and under-explicit. How many times can an apple be juicy? A wine be dry? Can champagne really dance on my tongue?

As I immerse myself in the world of nonfiction writing, I’m taking closer notice of the carefully crafted language some writer’s use. While reading the Seattle Times local section, last Monday, I stumbled upon “Show serves slice of state’s top crop” and was impressed by the writer’s opening description of that fruit we know so well – apples.

You can read the opening paragrah – an entire article for that matter – here. What do you think about the author’s opening description? Did it bring a vivid picture of apples to mind? Was it unique?
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5 Responses

  1. Sarah you are so much fun! Thank-you for hanging out with me Saturday night. I have the pictures ready to go and am sending them your way now. The bar pic is blurry, but hey, it was a bar. Hopefully it will work for you if you want to write a post.

    Keep in touch please!

    Laura

  2. I must admit that I only knew it was an apple because of the picture…I wonder what other word could have been added to give a better visual? It IS hard to write about food. I recently took a poetry class where we had to write in various ways about an orange…without mentioning the color.

    • Describing an orange without using orange would be challenging just because the word is so ingrained in our minds. Although, these days you could just reference the “color of the ING ball” ;)

  3. Don’t you just love words? There is such a fine balance between throwing in adjectives because its easy and finding the perfect word to describe a moment, person or place. I’m so enjoying hearing more about your writing process (what you are reading, writing, thinking, ect). As I pursue my MFA, I’m also engaging in similar thoughts, practices and discussions. I loved the adjectives that the author used. I would have loved reading more about the sensation she experienced when that apple first hit her tongue.

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